THE STORYBOARD CALLED LIFE

Be a Man

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Last week my company made an announcement to the market that made our share price drop dramatically. We had a few tough meetings about cutting costs (although I know all the managers had more than a few), leaving a sombre tone in a normally cheerful office.

Our CEO, Ted, led the difficult discussion of the hard agenda. I was  impressed by the way he spoke and carried himself. I am not even brown nosing – I don’t think he’d ever read this, it was my (and a few other people in the office’s) observation that he presented the hard truth well.

The way he carried himself was “like a man”. So I reflected a bit on how he presented and what aspects of masculinity he was personifying. I’m not sure why I enjoy writing about this topic, I should really be writing more posts directed to women, but maybe because I see the effect that men have on women.

When-Li-Shang-aka-Pretty-Boy-sings-her-about-being-man

 

Ownership

Ted only joined the ranks in January, so he has inherited all the decisions of the past management. While the poor decisions were not his to apologise for, he owned up to them anyway, because he inherited it in his position. This is a stark contrast to a lot of people (men aren’t exclusive to this) who don’t own up to their mistakes. So, be accountable for your decisions.

The Truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth

Six weeks into the job, Ted was already making hard but necessary changes. He didn’t sugar coat, evade or charm. He unashamedly laid everything out, warts and all. I think this is a sign of maturity and self-esteem to be able to be honest.

Decisive

Making tough decisions, especially ones that others don’t want to make because they’re difficult, even though they’re the right decision. These decisions will probably mean that the company will be viable for a lot longer.

Servant heart

Ted offered support in his power and puts hard yards in. there are no empty promises and whispered sweet words. A man sticks by his word and lends a hand when he can.

It ain’t easy

After the tough meeting, Ted walked out hurriedly, looking stressed and sad. I think this is the biggest lesson. It isn’t easy doing the right thing. It isn’t easy being a man. He said that he knows he won’t wake up and change his mind about the right thing to do.

If you think there is a massive disparity between a CEO making tough decisions and you, there isn’t. The only difference is one little decision.

Let’s get down to business. To defeat. The huns. 

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Written by Candice

March 8, 2017 at 12:00 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

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